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Old 27th December 2009, 04:14 PM   #1
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Question Computer games rating systems. (BBFC, CERO, ESRB, OFLC, PEGI, USK)

What is PEGI in relation to computers or computing?
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Old 27th December 2009, 04:38 PM   #2
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Default Re: Computer games rating systems. (PEGI, BBFC, ESRB, OFLC.)

It's a European ratings system designed for computer games.
Give me a few minutes to make a more precise post about the worldwide ratings system for computer games.
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Old 27th December 2009, 05:44 PM   #3
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Post Europe: PEGI

What is PEGI?

The Pan-European Game Information (PEGI) age rating system was established to help European parents make informed decisions on buying computer games. It was launched in spring 2003 and replaced a number of national age rating systems with a single system now used throughout most of Europe, in 30 countries (Austria Denmark, Hungary, Latvia, Norway, Slovenia, Belgium, Estonia, Iceland, Lithuania, Poland, Spain, Bulgaria, Finland, Ireland, Luxembourg, Portugal, Sweden, Cyprus, France, Israel, Malta, Romania, Switzerland, Czech Republic, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Slovak Republic and the United Kingdom)

The system is supported by the major console manufacturers, including Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo, as well as by publishers and developers of interactive games throughout Europe. The age rating system was developed by the Interactive Software Federation of Europe (ISFE).

The PEGI labels appear on front and back of the packaging indicating one of the following age levels: 3, 7, 12, 16 and 18. They provide a reliable indication of the suitability of the game content in terms of protection of minors. The age rating does not take into account the difficulty level or skills required to play a game.





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Old 27th December 2009, 06:07 PM   #4
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Post United Kingdom: BBFC

What is the BBFC?

The British Board of Film Classification is an independent, non-governmental body, which has classified cinema films since it was set up in 1912, and videos since the passing of the Video Recordings Act in 1984.
The BBFC is funded through the fees it charges to those who submit films and video works for classification. Here, and throughout the Guidelines, video works are taken to include video games, and films and programmes released on DVD or Blu-ray, or distributed by means of download or streaming on the internet. The BBFC classifies films on behalf of the local authorities who license cinemas under the Licensing Act 2003. The BBFC classifies video works which are released as video recordings under the Video Recordings Act 1984. (The video games covered by the VRA are those whose exemption is forfeited under section 2(2) because they depict human sexual activity, gross violence or other matters of concern.) The BBFC classifies video works which are distributed other than as a video recording (for example, by means of download or streaming over the internet) under a voluntary scheme called BBFC.online.

The BBFC will not classify material which it believes to be in breach of the criminal law.
Where possible the BBFC will carry out its responsibilities through appropriate use of the classification categories, particularly in order to protect children from any harm which may be caused. If necessary, however, the BBFC may cut or even reject a film or video work. The BBFC’s approach to material which is unacceptable at any category is set out in the ‘Intervention’ section of these Guidelines on page 32. In line with domestic administrative law principles and the requirements of the Human Rights Act 1998, there is a particular need to make the classification criteria clear. This is fulfilled by the publication of these Guidelines and their availability on the BBFC website or directly from the BBFC. The BBFC Classification Guidelines reflect all these considerations and are the product of public consultation with children and adults, research and the accumulated experience of the BBFC over many years.

The Guidelines, and the BBFC’s practice in applying them, have particular regard to any changes in public taste, attitudes and concerns; changes in the law; or new evidence from research or expert sources; and will be reviewed periodically.
The Guidelines, however, are not a legal document and should be interpreted in the spirit of what is intended as well as in the letter. They cannot be a comprehensive account of everything that may at any time be of concern. Should issues arise which are not specifically covered here, they will be dealt with by the BBFC on their merits and in line with the standards expressed and implied in these Guidelines.

Responsibility for the Guidelines and for their interpretation rests with the BBFC and is subject to normal considerations of fairness and reasonableness.
The BBFC undertakes to provide guidance on the interpretation of these Guidelines on request. Before allowing a child to view a work, parents are advised to consider carefully the classification, together with any accompanying Consumer Advice.



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Old 27th December 2009, 06:11 PM   #5
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Post United States: ESRB

What is the ESRB?

The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) is a non-profit, self-regulatory body established in 1994 by the Entertainment Software Association (ESA), formerly known as the Interactive Digital Software Association (IDSA). ESRB assigns computer and video game content ratings, enforces industry-adopted advertising guidelines and helps ensure responsible online privacy practices for the interactive entertainment software industry.


The rating system is voluntary, although virtually all games that are sold at retail in the U.S. and Canada are rated by the ESRB. Many retailers, including most major chains, have policies to only stock or sell games that carry an ESRB rating, and most console manufacturers will only permit games that have been rated by ESRB to be published for their platforms.



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Old 27th December 2009, 06:15 PM   #6
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Post Australia: OFLC / The Classification Board

What is the Classification Board?

The
Classification Board Board is an independent statutory body which makes classification decisions about films, computer games and publications. Principles for decision making are set out in the National Classification Code, agreed by the Australian Government and the States and Territories.


Films (including public exhibition and DVD) and computer games may be classified G, PG, M or MA 15+. Films can also be classified R 18+ or X 18+.
Please note: Classifications of R 18+ and X 18+ are not applicable for computer games.

Each classification is coloured. G is green, PG is yellow, M is blue, MA 15+ is red and R 18+ and X 18+ are both black. The examples below display the three main components of a classification marking:
  • classification symbol
  • classification description
  • consumer advice, which is specific to each film and computer game, and which informs consumers about some of the content in a film or computer game.




Quote:

R 18+ classification for computer games starts 1 January 2013


New computer games classification legislation starts January 2013.

What does this mean?

From 1 January 2013, there is an R 18+ category for computer games, where previously the highest classification available for computer games was MA 15+.

Adults will now be able to buy or hire computer games classified R 18+.
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Old 15th March 2010, 09:34 PM   #7
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Post Japan: CERO

What is CERO? (Computer Entertainment Rating Organization)


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Old 15th March 2010, 09:34 PM   #8
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Post Germany: USK

What is the USK? (Unterhaltssoftware Selbstkontrolle)

USK is the German abbreviation for the Entertainment Software Self-Regulation Body, established by the computer games industry to act as the organisation responsible for the classification of computer games in Germany. The USK has conducted around 30,000 classification procedures since being established in 1994. It employs eight permanent staff at its Head Office in Berlin as well as engaging the services of six voluntary game testers and over 50 child protection experts. The USK archive extends to more than 17,000 titles and is one of the largest computer and video game archives in the world.

The German Entertainment Software Self-Regulation Body (USK) is owned by the company “Freiwillige Selbstkontrolle Unterhaltungssoftware GmbH”. Being a non-profit limited company, the shareholders are the branch associations of the games development, manufacture and distribution industry in Germany (the Federal Association of Interactive Entertainment Software, BIU, and the Federal Association of Computer Game Developers, G.A.M.E.). Although these shareholders bear the economic risk of the limited company, they are not responsible for the age rating classification procedures.

The USK has been in operation for more than 15 years and is one of the major institutions for the protection of children and young persons in the field of computer and video games. Games have now become an integral part of our everyday culture. Playing games takes place alone, with family and friends or online together with other players. Girls, boys, young persons and adults all participate. Games offer plenty of entertainment as well as providing at least as many opportunities for learning. As is the case with any other medium, however, computer games also bring inherent risks and dangers in their wake.

The USK organises a classification procedure via which the relevant state authorities issue age rating symbols for games. This system ensures that computer games are only sold to children and young persons if the contents of the games have been approved for their age group. Age categorisations are based on the provisions of the law relating to the protection of young persons and not on the degree of difficulty of a game. The principles of the USK are acknowledged by an Advisory Council and updated if required.


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age appropriate, BBFC, CERO, classification, ESRB, game ratings, oflc, parental controls, PEGI, ratings system, USK


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